New York Times

Quentin Hardy Today

New York Times deputy technology editor Quentin Hardy appears tomorrow night at a sold-out PRSA event in Silicon Valley. Billed as an "enterprise tech" journalist, Quentin does cover AI, and a bit of cloud. Truth is, Quentin hasn't sourced his own material all that much lately; instead he opines on other NYT reporters' material as part of the NYT's Daily Report.

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Mar. 28, 2016

Former Fortune reporter Stacey Higginbotham last week launched her own email newsletter. It's called "Stacey Knows Things," and to no one's surprise it's focused on the Internet of Things. The first one contained a 362-word lead story (on Nest), a two-paragraph billboard for her 51st IoT podcast, and ten briefs structured much like the one you're reading right now.

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Edit's Advice to PR in 2015

With 2016 now so close, we thought we'd package what we felt were 2015's most poignant PR takeaways from the many tech and business journalists we interviewed. We kept the list quite short and focused only on the counter-intuitive. Let's get right to it.

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2016: Trends and Opportunities

 

If anyone knows for sure what "mobile content" will look like next year, it should be Forbes, with several apps already out and more on the way. But even Forbes doesn't. That's why last month it held an internal "100% Mobile Day" in which reporters, editors and folks from the sales and PR side brainstormed what "Forbes for your phone" might look like.

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CEO Profiles, Parts 1 & 2

We've been studying CEO profiles lately -- because subscribers have been asking us to. Here's what we found. CEO profiles focus either on CEOs getting to the top, or the techniques they use to stay there. The getting-to-the-top pieces are almost always "Can They Do It" stories, portraying a CEO's quest to establish a new marketplace or vanquish entrenched competitors.

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At Bloomberg, the Brad Stone/Tom Giles Era Begins

Bloomberg tech reporters are happy these days. Brad Stone and Tom Giles, two admired figures in the newsroom, were promoted this week and now run Bloomberg tech edit free from bureaucracy. Says one Bloomberg insider of Brad: "I think he's one of -- if not the most -- respected journalist in the Valley just based on the fairness of his reporting and how he treats people."

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Where Are All the Narratives?

Is the tech narrative endangered? Lately we've cased the web for the kinds of stories we used to see everywhere -- the 600-to-800 word news story about a tech company claiming to have built something better, cheaper or faster, or otherwise out to change the world. We found far fewer than we expected, even where they once were abundant.

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Native Ads: They've Arrived. Here is Why You Should Care.

July turned out to be hot for native advertising. The New York Times this week launched native ad operations in London. On Jul. 21 in San Francisco, Sharethrough will stage its annual native advertising summit, reaping $1,450 per ticket for an eight-hour event.

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Profile: Steve Lohr, NY Times

Steve Lohr began reporting professionally 40 years ago. Since 1979 he's been at it for the New York Times. A guy like this is beyond PR persuasion. Best to stand back and listen to the man. "On the PR side you really don't want to hear this, but what you want is tension. We shouldn't be writing 'victory lap' stories about companies. This is a journalism by-product of the boom -- writing hero stories. We're starting to see it come back..."
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